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efficient treatment method for Stable Vitiligo issar pharma

Melanocyte-Keratinocyte Transplantation (MKTP) is an Efficient Treatment Method for Stable Vitiligo

A latest study published in the Impact Journals LLC, proposed that autologous, non-cultured melanocyte-keratinocyte transplantation (MKTP) was found to be effective in patients with stable vitiligo.

The study was a single-center retrospective study which comprised of 2283 patients with different types of vitiligo who had undergone MKTP between June 2009 and June 2018. Follow-up data of 1-9 years was extracted from these patients. Out of the 2283 patients, 94.4% of them were followed up for 2 years at least, with 971 males, 1310 females and a mean age of 24.1 years.

Half of the patients had non-segmental vitiligo and the remaining had segmental or undefined vitiligo. The most commonly observed transplantation sites were the face and the neck followed by the back region of the hand. Univariate or multivariate analysis along with retrospective evaluation of long-term regimentation with MKTP was carried out to determine the factors associated with positive outcomes.

The results showed excellent repigmentation in 66% of segmental vitiligo patients, 53.5% of undefined vitiligo patients and 46.5% of non-segmental vitiligo patients. Younger age groups showed better repigmentation than older age groups. Overall, a positive, strong association was determined between vitiligo stability and percentage of repigmentation.

Thus, the findings of the study revealed that MKTP is an effective and well-tolerated treatment modality for patients with stable vitiligo. Careful monitoring of vitiligo type, stability, site and history is recommended before MKTP, for improved repigmentation post-operatively.

Source: Zhang D, Wei X, Hong W, Fu L, Qian G, Xu A. A retrospective study of long term follow-up of 2283 vitiligo patients treated by autologous, non-cultured melanocyte–keratinocyte transplantation. Aging (Albany NY). (2021); 13(4):5415-5425.

Source link: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33582653/